Scale

Sagrada Familia
Can you tell how high the ceiling is? It’s difficult to get a sense of scale in a picture that was clicked looking straight up, isn’t it?

Graceful

Arches
High ceilings of cathedrals. Imposing, yes, but with their gently leaning arches, they’re also graceful.

For Jennifer Nichole Wells’ Color Your World Challenge: Desert Sand.

Colorful ceilings

Colorful ceiling patternSome of Madrid’s cathedrals have great interiors, and that includes ceilings. Take this one, for example. In contrast to the walls and windows, the ceiling was vibrant, with all the colors of a rainbow and then some!

Light and Shadow

Lights

A picture for the Monochrome Madness series; to view other excellent submissions, please visit Leanne Cole’s post this week.

This is one of the pictures I clicked on a boring day indoors that I decided to spruce up by experimenting with photographing the lights at home. Bright lights and low exposure do make for some art! I swear I never really liked the texture of that wall much before I processed this photograph. 🙂

Ceilings and Intricacy

Ceilings and Intricacy
The details in historical buildings never cease to amaze and impress me, especially because of the amount of manual work that would have gone into them. My first thought when thinking of ‘intricacy‘ for this week’s photo-challenge was of the pillars and ceilings at our ancestral home. Unfortunately, I don’t have clear pictures of those, and my mind naturally drifted to other ceilings. The first one that I recalled was this one captured during our vacation at Toledo, Spain. The long ceiling with its interweaving patterns, contrasting with its surroundings, was just too good to resist clicking! 🙂

Asymmetrical symmetry

Who isn’t fascinated by symmetry? I know I’m drawn to it. But after a while, clicking symmetrical pictures gets repetitive. When that happened to me, I stopped clicking the ‘same old same old’ pictures because I just didn’t feel anything new when I saw those pictures.

In time, I learned to change the way I see things. I’m back to capturing symmetry, but now I make sure there’s something different, something asymmetrical, about the capture. I personally feel I appreciate the objects of these photographs better because the symmetry doesn’t overpower the object itself.

Symmetry in a ceiling

Symmetry in a ceiling

I clicked this at a cathedral in Madrid standing slightly off-centre below the ceiling. Do you think this gives a different perspective to the scene than if I’d stood right below the centre?